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Towson, MD


Towson, MD

Towson is an unincorporated community located in Baltimore County, Maryland. Although unincorporated, the community serves as the county seat and it is one of the largest unincorporated county seats in the nation. A suburb of Baltimore, Towson lies 11 miles north of Maryland's largest city, just inside the Beltway (Interstate I-695). Maryland State Highway 45 also services Towson and Interstate I-83 is situated just to its west. Nearby communities include Hampton (to the north), Parkville (to the east), and Riderwood (to the west). Towson is home to Towson State University.

The community traces its roots to the mid-18th century when two Pennsylvania brothers, William and Thomas Towson, began farming the area. A small village (then called "Towsontown") soon developed, and in 1854 Towson officially became the Baltimore County Seat. A period of construction followed, leaving many structures built in distinctive 19th Century style that are still visible today. The community has grown rapidly since World War II, and now serves as a center for education, medicine, county government, and as of recent years also a retail destination. Towson, MD At the beginning of the century, Towson remained largely a rural community. Land continued to be sold by the acre, rather than as home parcels. Most residences lay within Towson proper: no houses existed west of Central Avenue along Allegheny or Pennsylvania avenues, and there were only three homes along the West Chesapeake Avenue corridor.

As the growth of Baltimore's suburbs became more pronounced after World War II, considerable office development took place in Towson's central core area. Many of the large Victorian and colonial-style residences in the vicinity of the Court House were demolished in the 1980s and 1990s for offices and parking.

In 1839, Epsom Chapel became the first Christian house of worship in Towson, used by various denominations. As the population grew in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, several churches were built to serve the community, such as Calvary Baptist Church, Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Trinity Episcopal Church, First Methodist Church, and Towson Presbyterian Church. Epsom Chapel was demolished in 1950 when Goucher College sold a portion of its property for development of the Towson Plaza shopping center, now Towson Town Center. First Methodist Church moved in 1958 to land also acquired from Goucher College and is now Towson United Methodist Church.
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Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 51,793 people, 21,063 households, and 11,331 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 3,688.7 people per square mile (1,424.3/km²). There were 21,997 housing units at an average density of 1,566.6 per square mile (604.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 86.9% White, 7.53% African American, 0.10% Native American, 3.7% Asian, and 1.9% Hispanic.

There were 21,063 households out of which 23.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.6% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 46.2% were non-families. 36.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.16 and the average family size was 2.87.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 17.4% under the age of 18, 17.5% from 18 to 24, 24.9% from 25 to 44, 20.1% from 45 to 64, and 20.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 82.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 78.8 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $53,775, and the median income for a family was $75,832 (these figures had risen to $64,313 and $98,744 respectively as of a 2007 estimate[30]). Males had a median income of $49,554 versus $38,172 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $32,502. About 2.5% of families and 7.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.8% of those under age 18 and 4.7% of those age 65 or over.
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Population

Total Population 53,922
Population Density 3840 Persons/Sq. Mile
Female Population 29,499
Male Population 24,423
Median resident age: 37.6 years
Maryland median age: 36.0 years
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Households & Income

Median Household Income:
Towson: $67,000
Maryland: $70,545
Median Home Cost $273,140
Household Size 2,16
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Arts, Culture, and Entertainment

Towson, MD There is an abundance of historic buildings in Towson. The Hampton National Historic Site contains a beautiful mansion built in the late 18th century which houses ancient paintings and antique furniture, and also a farmhouse. The Trinity Episcopal Church, Towson's oldest standing church, was built with stone and dedicated in 1860. The Gothic Revival structure has two signed Tiffany stained glass windows. The Schmuck House, Towson's oldest remaining building, is a Federal-style stone house built between 1833 and 1841. The Courthouse, constructed with local limestone and granite, was built between 1854 and 1856 on land donated by Dr. Grafton Bosley.

Musical entertainment of all types is performed at Towson's Recher Theatre. Located right in the heart of Towson, the theatre attracts crowds that gather to enjoy reggae, rap, pop, blues, and other types of contemporary music. Towson also hosts a number of annual events. The Towsontown Spring Festival features over 400 vendors, along with a variety of ethnic foods and musical entertainment on four stages. The Oktoberfest at Timonium Fairgrounds features food, drink, music, dancing, and loads of fun.

Sports fans have lots to look forward to only a few minutes away in nearby Baltimore. The U.S. Lacrosse Museum and National Hall of Fame is located in the city, as is the Babe Ruth Museum (Baltimore is the birthplace of the baseball great). The city is also home to several major-league teams, including the Orioles (Major League Baseball), Ravens (National Football League), Bayhawks (Major League Lacrosse), Pearls (American Basketball Association), and Blast (Major Indoor Soccer League)
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Education

Towson University is a public school in southern Towson. Towson University's student population is close to 20,000, making it the second largest institution in the University System of Maryland. TU is home to the largest Business School in the state of Maryland, with 2,500 students. It was founded in 1866 as the Maryland State Normal School for the training of teachers. North of downtown is a small private liberal arts school, Goucher College, which was founded in 1885 as The Woman's College of Baltimore.
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Attractions

Towson, MD Towson Town Center is Baltimore County's largest indoor mall, with four stories of shops and a parking garage, which is also linked to some other shops across the street, including a Barnes and Noble, which structurally is beneath Joppa Road near the Towson Circle. Also nearby is Allegheny Avenue, the main street of downtown Towson, which offers a variety of local eateries.

One block away from Towson Town Center is Towson Commons, a smaller mall that was once most notably home to Borders Books, but has since declined and now houses offices upstairs and a lone AMC movie theater.

The Shops at Kenilworth, formerly known as Kenilworth Park and also as Kenilworth Bazaar, is a small indoor mall located on Kenilworth Drive. The mall at one time was home to an express location of the Motor Vehicle Administration, which has since moved.

The Towson Marketplace is a major shopping area near Joppa Road, Goucher Boulevard, and Putty Hill Avenue. Built on the site of the Eudowood Sanatarium, the original Eudowood Plaza shopping center was an open mall anchored by Montgomery Ward. Renovated in the early 1980s to an indoor mall, the location has been converted into some big box stores and supermarkets, including a Wal-Mart, Target, Marshall's, Sports Authority, Superfresh, and Bed Bath & Beyond.

The Recher Theatre, located in downtown Towson, is a popular concert venue for popular local and national acts.

Towson University's arena Towson Center and stadium Unitas Stadium are both main destinations for Towson Tiger athletics and other events.